The modus operandi of transferring your RSS feeds post the shutdown of Google Reader

In case you’re still hooked on to Google Reader posting your RSS feeds to it, you must have been sent alerts about the services shutting down. Google broadcast-ed the closure of Google Reader from 1st July, and so, it’s high time that you switched over and transferred your subscriptions to other services like Feedly or News Blur, if you haven’t yet. To be a little elaborate you should simply stop sending any further subscriptions to Google Reader and ensure that you upgrade your data through Google Takeout so that your meticulously cultivated RSS feeds do not become extinct.

 

As of now, you have many options and your alternatives are likely to go up in the months that follow. The following lines explain how your RSS feeds can find a new nesting place in other websites and the modus operandi of making the switch.

 

Image representing Google Reader as depicted i...
Image via CrunchBase

 

Exporting and claiming ownership of your feeds

 

Now that you know that Google Reader has closed shop, you’ll naturally want to shift all your feeds on a primary basis. RSS readers of your postings with Google Reader will be shifting your subscriptions as a matter of course the moment they tap into your account with Google.  On your end, you should first save all your feeds by creating a file or folder and storing the same in it. Thereafter, you should be staking claim to your subscriptions by transferring your existing feeds with Google Reader to other services.

 

Google Chrome
Google Chrome (Photo credit: thms.nl)

 

For ensuring that, you’ll need to redirect to Google Takeout and click on the tab ‘Choose Services’. Thereafter, you’ll have to click on the icon marked ‘Reader’. Google Takeout will work out the total number of dossiers (along with their sizes) that need to be exported in no time. A ZIP file will be automatically created when you click on the icon that says ‘Create Archive’. Subsequently click on the ‘downloads’ tabs for downloading data to your computer’s hard drive.

 

On opening the ZIP file, you’ll view a ‘Reader’ folder, and when you click open that folder, you’ll be led to a .xml file which stores all your feeds or subscriptions. Thereafter, it’s upto you to decide where you’d prefer to store your RSS contributions. You can take your pick from the following services.

 

Feedly

 

Though you have a plenty of choices, one of the most popular services is Feedly. Feedly has of late, brought out Feedly Cloud. You’ll find Feedly very user friendly as you would be able to navigate through their site with ease. Those entrusted with managing Feedly were aware that Google Reader would be closing down shortly and therefore were kept busy helping the subscribers of Reader make the shift to their services. If you’re thinking making the shift to Feedly, you’ll be able to make good use of their Android app.

 

Digg

 

Digg is a new kid on the block and is owned by Betaworks. It is proving to be a big hit with RSS readers. Though it has got underway only recently, it is being lapped up quickly by new users. Anyway, to send your feeds to Digg, you’ll first have to open a fresh account (despite the fact that you already had signed up with them in the past). Digg, like Feedly will be able to draw up your entire Google Reader contributions if you become their subscriber prior to July 1. You’ll find the Diggs icons absolutely stunning on each narrative.

 

There are other services you can select from like ‘Flipboard,’ ‘The Old Reader’, ‘AOL Reader’, and ‘NewsBlur’ to name a few.

 

   

 

 

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